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Game 52: Twins @ Royals

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Lineup

Minnesota Twins @ Kansas City Royals

05/28/08 8:10 PM EDT

Minnesota Twins Kansas City Royals
Carlos Gomez - CF David DeJesus - RF
Alexi Casilla - 2B Joey Gathright - CF
Joe Mauer - C Alex Gordon - 3B
Justin Morneau - 1B Jose Guillen - LF
Michael Cuddyer - RF Miguel Olivo - C
Jason Kubel - DH Mark Teahen - 1B
Delmon Young - LF Billy Butler - DH
Mike Lamb - 3B Alberto Callaspo - 2B
Brendan Harris - SS Tony Pena - SS



W-L G GS CG SHO SV BS IP H R ER HR BB K ERA WHIP
2008 - Zack Greinke 5-2 10 10 1 0 0 0 67.0 66 22 21 7 17 45 2.82 1.24
Greinke appears to be regaining some of that promise he earned as a 20-year old in 2004. Now 24, he's off to an exceptional start to the season, and coming off the only start that I'd call disappointing. In fact, of his 10 starts this season, eight have been quality starts. His success this season is due to a number of factors: keeping the ball in the park in a similar fashion to last year (after allowing quite a few his first three years), being stingy with walks, and keeping hitters off-balance. Greinke's fastball registers 92-96, with a good curve and also a slider and changeup, which come in around the same speeds. Also interesting about the changeup--it breaks differently than the fastball. After looking through data from pitchfx, I can't tell you if it's because the fastball is straighter than the change or vice-versa, but one of them has more movement than the other. This much is true: his changeup spins more than his fastball. That's not run-of-the-mill.

W-L G GS CG SHO SV BS IP H R ER HR BB K ERA WHIP
2008 - Livan Hernandez 6-2 11 11 1 0 0 0 70.1 90 36 33 9 13 22 4.22 1.46
Prior to his five-inning, five-run performance on May 22, Livandez put together four consecutive quality starts. We know he survives on guile--location, changing speeds (such as he can) and horizontal movement--which is something we don't easily put faith into. All the same he's been effective, and has rewarded Minnesota's $5 million dollar investment. Keeping the Kansas City offense won't exactly be his most taxing assignment (you'd hope), but this is baseball, where weird shit happens everyday. General keys to success: Induce ground balls, limit walks and don't allow their potent hitters to get ahold of one.