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Twinkie Town Prospect Vote: Round 2

Which former first round pick is the 2 prospect?

None of these are prospects.Just pretend they are.
None of these are prospects.Just pretend they are.
Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Congratulations to Stephen Gonsalves for winning round one. No new names are added for round two, so it is a battle between the last three first round draft picks: Nick Gordon, Tyler Jay, and Alex Kirilloff.

Twins top 30 prospects for 2017

  1. Stephen Gonsalves - 52% (Gordon 34%, Kirilloff 8%, Jay 7%)

Nick Gordon, SS
2017 Age: 21
2016 High Level: Fort Myers (A+)

The former first round selection had a solid season at Fort Myers despite being about 2.5 years younger than the rest of the competition. He hit .291/.335/.386 but his stolen base percentage was not good so he has some work to do to improve on the basepaths. He has solid range at shortstop but needs polish to improve on his 26 errors. Scouts are mixed as to whether he is a shortstop or second baseman in the majors but most agree that he has the tools to be a solid big leaguer. He was rewarded for his good play by being asked to participate in the Arizona Fall League where he hit .346/.418/.444 and was named on top 10 prospect lists. He should begin the season in AA and the majors aren't that far away.

Tyler Jay, LHP
2017 Age: 23
2016 High Level: Chattanooga (AA)

The 2015 first rounder started his first games at Fort Myers in 2016. The conversion to starting pitcher went so well (8.8 K/9, 2.7 BB/9, 3.10 Run Average) that he was promoted mid-season to Chattanooga. Unfortunately things didn't go as well as they did for Gonsalves. Jay only made two starts and five appearances at AA before he was shut down for the season with a neck strain. Still, the conversion to starting pitcher was promising for the lefty with electric stuff.

Alex Kirilloff, OF
2017 Age: 19
2016 High Level: Elizabethton (Rookie)

Drafted in the 1st round by the Twins in 2016, Kirilloff grew up in the batting cages run by his father. He was aggressively sent to advanced Rookie ball out of high school and produced, eventually being named Appalachian League player of the year. He hit to a .306/.341/.454 line and seems to have a high floor offensively. The questions remaining for Alex are whether he can maintain that production as the pitching gets tougher and also whether he has enough range to handle a corner outfield position defensively.