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Comparing stats through the first week of recent Twins seasons

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Small sample sizes for the win.

Minnesota Twins v Philadelphia Phillies
At the top of the stat boards one week, no longer a Twin practically the next.

We’re seven games into the Minnesota Twins’ 2020 schedule and it’s a lot warmer than it ordinarily is.

With a scheduled 60-game season, each game has more impact on the final standings than in a 162-game season. But seven games is still a small sample size, too early to make locked-in determinations on how the rest of a season will go.

To compare, here are some Twins statistics through seven games of the previous four seasons. (NOTE: For seven-game samples, all players on the roster are included; for the end of the season, only those who qualified by Baseball Reference standards — two plate appearances or three-tenths of an inning pitched per team game played — are.)

Record:

  • 2016: 0-7 (finished 59-103)
  • 2017: 5-2 (finished 85-77)
  • 2018: 4-3 (finished 78-84)
  • 2019: 5-2 (finished 101-61)
  • 2020: 5-2

Team home runs:

  • ‘16: 4 (finished with 200)
  • ‘17: 5 (finished with 206)
  • ‘18: 12 (finished with 166)
  • ‘19: 6 (finished with 307)
  • ‘20: 12

Batting average leader:

  • ‘16: Eduardo Nunez, .667 (end of season: Núñez, .296)
  • ‘17: Eduardo Escobar, .400 (end of season: Joe Mauer, .305)
  • ‘18: Ryan LaMarre, .667 (end of season: Jorge Polanco & Eddie Rosario, .288)
  • ‘19: Willians Astudillo, .500 (end of season: Luis Arraez, .334)
  • ‘20: Arraez, Nelson Cruz, and Alex Avila: .333 each

Home run leader:

  • ‘16: 4 players (Joe Mauer, Trevor Plouffe, Brian Dozier, Byungho Park), 1 each (end of season: Dozier, 42)
  • ‘17: Miguel Sano, 2 (end of season: Dozier, 34)
  • ‘18: Dozier, 4 (end of season: Rosario, 24)
  • ‘19: Max Kepler, 2 (end of season: Cruz, 41)
  • ‘20: Cruz & Kepler, 3 each

OPS leader

  • ‘16: Núñez, 1.381 (end of season: Dozier, .886)
  • ‘17: Sanó, 1.220 (end of season: Sanó, .859)
  • ‘18: LaMarre, 1.333 (end of season: Escobar, .852)
  • ‘19: Astudillo, 1.458 (end of season: Cruz, 1.031)
  • ‘20: Avila, 1.167

Strikeouts leader

  • ‘16: Ervin Santana & Trevor May, 10 each (end of season: Santana, 149)
  • ‘17: Santana, 7 (end of season: Santana, 167)
  • ‘18: Jose Berrios, 13 (end of season: Berríos, 202)
  • ‘19: Berríos, 14 (end of season: Berríos, 195)
  • ‘20: Berríos & Randy Dobnak, 7 each

ERA leader

(NOTE: ties for ERA are broken by the most innings pitched)

  • ‘16: Ryan Pressly, 0.00 over 6.0 IP (end of season: Brandon Kintzler, 3.15)
  • ‘17: Kintzler & Michael Tonkin, 0.00 over 4.1 IP each (end of season: Taylor Rogers, 3.07)
  • ‘18: Addison Reed, 0.00 over 5.1 IP (end of season: Rogers, 2.63)
  • ‘19: May & Trevor Hildenberger, 0.00 over 3.0 IP each (end of season: Tyler Duffey, 2.50)
  • ‘20: Rich Hill, 0.00 over 5.0 IP

FIP leader

  • ‘16: Glen Perkins, 1.65 (end of season: Rogers, 3.57)
  • ‘17: Rogers, 0.66 (end of season: Duffey, 3.72)
  • ‘18: Tyler Kinley, 2.16 (end of season: Rogers, 2.33)
  • ‘19: Hildenberger, 0.88 (end of season: Rogers, 2.85)
  • ‘20: Duffey. -0.91 (yes, that is a negative number)

It’s clear a lot can change between now and season’s end, assuming season’s end comes later than sooner. For now, it may be best to avoid excessive extrapolation from small sample sizes, as fun as it may be.